9 Months Off Skates: The Derby Pregnancy Blog #7

 Me and my sister after a race. Sorry sis, it's a much better picture of me than you. You can use bad pictures of me for your blog. Oh wait. You don't have one. Photo credit: Susan B. Slamthony

Me and my sister after a race. Sorry sis, it's a much better picture of me than you. You can use bad pictures of me for your blog. Oh wait. You don't have one. Photo credit: Susan B. Slamthony

First Workout After

For my first workout after the baby was born, I turned to my beloved big sister. She had gotten me started on running years ago and even when I am jogging just above the speed of a brisk walk, she's been a great workout buddy. Plus, her second child was born just a year before my baby, so she still remembered very freshly how hard that first work out could be. 

"Leave the babies at home, we're going for a run." 

I was nine weeks post-partum. I probably could have started working out sooner, but I'm sure you can imagine all the reasons why, after delivering a 9.5 pound baby, I chose to delay. 

We laced up and started running. She took us in a large loop in the residential streets near her home. We were never so close that I could just say, "I'm tired" and turn around.

After about 15 minutes, she asked me how I was doing.

"I'm struggling. Can we slow down?" And we slowed. She did the talking and we kept running. 
After another five, she asked "Are you okay?" "It hurts," I said. "You feel like your butthole is about to fall out?" she asked me, not unkindly. 

It perfectly described my pain. "Yes. I think my butthole *is* about to fall out." She pointed, "Go home. You're done for the day." 

And so I slowed to a walk (well, honestly, I just switched from jogging as slow as my walk to not even pretending to be jogging) and walked the five blocks home. 

For your first work out, gentle reader, I highly recommend finding a buddy to go with. Someone who will understand that it is a huge accomplishment to be active again and will understand it when you are working to overcome the issues of pain or discomfort, but who wont let you give up on yourself. 

#96 Susan B. Slamthony